1. The view from local government: Reconsidering accountability in an age of integrated care

    (Guest blogger)
    20 Jul 2015
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    There is cross-party consensus both within the Local Government Association and nationally that integration of health and social care is the right approach, particularly for improving outcomes for citizens, but also for improving value for money in the long term. But how this move towards integration works in practice is up for debate, as mentioned in Ben Jupp's viewpoint paper recently published by the Nuffield Trust.

    Jeremy Hunt is clear that a strong NHS depends on a strong...

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  2. The view from commissioners: Reconsidering accountability in an age of integrated care

    (Guest blogger)
    17 Jul 2015
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    Steve Kell, Co-Chair of NHS Clinical Commissioners, argues that concerns that conflicts of interest between GPs as commissioners and GPs as providers of care would hinder decision making have so far proved unfounded. CCGs and their governing bodies are recognising where conflicts of interest might arise and are managing them, rather than seeing them as a barrier to commissioning high-quality care in a local context.

    Therefore, he argues that we already have the structures in place to deliver improvements to population health and that we should focus first on improving health...

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  3. The view from Healthwatch: Reconsidering accountability in an age of integrated care

    (Guest blogger)
    16 Jul 2015
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    Responding to Ben Jupp's paper 'Reconsidering accountability in an age of integrated care', Jan Sensier argues that the most important factor for real accountability in the face of changing services is the voice of the public and patient.

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  4. The view from Westminster: Reconsidering accountability in an age of integrated care

    (Guest blogger)
    15 Jul 2015
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    All too often, discussions about accountability focus on structures and processes, emphasising the importance of reconciling different interests. All of that is important, but it is in danger of confusing method with purpose, argues Stephen Dorrell in a blog responding to a recent paper by Ben Jupp.

    He adds that accountability structures don’t exist to justify the status quo – they exist to facilitate change. Measured against that test, Ben is right to question whether current commissioning structures are fit for purpose. 

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